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Julie Schenkelberg

From The Ashes

September 12 - October 24, 2020

Sculpture by Julie Schenkelberg

Julie Schenkelberg

Ancient Homage, 2020

Vintage fabric, screen material, plaster, metal bars from Detroit abandoned car manufacturing floors, copper wire, vintage jewelry box

35h x 3w x 23d in
88.90h x 7.62w x 58.42d cm

Julie Schenkelberg, Sun Pair One & Sun Pair Two, 2020

Julie Schenkelberg

Sun Pair One & Sun Pair Two, 2020

Wax covered vintage fabric, resin, acrylic gold paint and ink on plaster, metal from Detroit factory floors, plaster, jewelry box, vintage pin, found glass from Lake Erie, sand from Brooklyn, clock pendulum

23h x 12w x 1d in

 

Sculpture by Julie Schenkelberg

Julie Schenkelberg

Beacon, 2020

Relief mold of vintage pressed glass, Carrara marble window sill salvage, salvaged metal grating, found vintage nails, resin, plaster

19.50h x 14.50w x 2d in
49.53h x 36.83w x 5.08d cm

Sculpture by Julie Schenkelberg

Julie Schenkelberg

Splendor, 2020

Vintage broken china from Brooklyn beaches, found glass from Great Lakes, Cleveland and Detroit auto and steel factory abandoned floors, found screen, plaster, acrylic paint, painted wood from Ohio forests, copper found in Detroit, wax covered vintage fabric, Carrara marble, resin, found tureen top

28h x 23w x 4d in
71.12h x 58.42w x 10.16d cm

Sculpture by Julie Schenkelberg

Julie Schenkelberg

Blue Ocean, 2020

Blue dye, resin, rusted metal from Detroit factory floors, plaster chips, vintage china, glass from Brooklyn beaches

34h x 30w x 4d in
86.36h x 76.20w x 10.16d cm

Sculpture by Julie Schenkelberg

Julie Schenkelberg

Curio, 2020

Old typeset printer’s drawer, plaster, acrylic paint and medium, vintage fabric, found Detroit rusted factory metal and scrap copper wire, soil and pine needles

26h x 20w x 2d in
66.04h x 50.80w x 5.08d cm

Sculpture by Julie Schenkelberg

Julie Schenkelberg

Modern Memorial, 2020

Found screen, plaster, acrylic paint, vintage leather and fabric, jewelry box interior, glass gathered from Cleveland and Detroit auto and steel factory abandoned floors, vintage glass slide of the Parthenon Frieze

26h x 19w x 2d in
66.04h x 48.26w x 5.08d cm

Sculpture by Julie Schenkelberg

Julie Schenkelberg

Jewel Box, 2020

Found jewelry box, stones from Lake Erie, found china, vintage pin, resin

11.50h x 7.75w x 2d in
29.21h x 19.69w x 5.08d cm

Sculpture by Julie Schenkelberg

Julie Schenkelberg

Sun Pair One, 2020

Wax covered vintage fabric, resin, acrylic gold paint and ink on plaster, metal from Detroit factory floors, plaster, jewelry box, vintage pin, found glass from Lake Erie, sand from Brooklyn, clock pendulum

23h x 12w x 1d in
58.42h x 30.48w x 2.54d cm

Sculpture by Julie Schenkelberg

Julie Schenkelberg

Sun Pair Two, 2020

Wax covered vintage fabric, resin, acrylic gold paint and ink on plaster, metal from Detroit factory floors, plaster, jewelry box, vintage pin, found glass from Lake Erie, sand from Brooklyn, clock pendulum

23h x 12w x 1d in
58.42h x 30.48w x 2.54d cm

Sculpture by Julie Schenkelberg

Julie Schenkelberg

Clock Key, 2020

Plate found in field (Ohio), clock key, vintage pin, found plastic gem, found oyster shell from cape cod bay, copper and steel nails, metal mesh, wooden frame, resin, plaster (Hydrocal), acrylic paint

19h x 14w x 2d in
48.26h x 35.56w x 5.08d cm

Sculpture by Julie Schenkelberg

Julie Schenkelberg

Continuum, 2020

1890’s oak secretary desk, brass claw feet from vintage dining room table, wood from Ohio, found oyster-shells (Cape Cod Bay), patent leather, paper, vintage fabric, plaster, wisteria vine, acrylic paint, found drift wood (Lake Erie), Carrara Marble, Metal found (Detroit)

59.50h x 35w x 29d in
151.13h x 88.90w x 73.66d cm

Press Release

Asya Geisberg Gallery is pleased to present "From the Ashes", the fifth solo presentation of Julie Schenkelberg. "From the Ashes" is both a timely response to the moment we find ourselves in, and a continuation of the artist's symbolic excavation and elevation of discarded or decaying forms. While we all hope that the present is but a blip of malaise that will recede in our memories, its anxiety and insecurity speaks to a cultural upheaval that we have experienced numerous times. While Schenkelberg's inspiration originated in her Midwestern Rust-Belt environs and its endless stream of material, from the former auto factories of Detroit to the crumbling Art-Deco banks of Cleveland, her references now scour a vaster visual dictionary of decay, hope, and rebuilding. Combining research in ancient symbols of the sacred across societies with physical detritus gathered throughout the US, Schenkelberg marries ever wider ranging ideas and visual entry points.

Comprised of wall sculptures and a mid-sized installation, "From the Ashes" feels less theatrical than previous iterations of the architectural, vast, site-specific works for which Schenkelberg has become known. Distilled into concentrated portions, the work is more archival, and human-scaled, as if a recluse hired an archaeologist to painstakingly sort through decades of artifacts stuffed in their attic. But rather than the classic hoarder's anguished psychological disarray witnessed in piles of inconsequential rot, we feel a reverential motivation - as if deifying scraps of a saint's robes into a spot-lit relic chamber. Schenkelberg somehow manages to have us both recognize the rudimentary origin of her collections, and also see its crystallized transformation into an ethereal combination of concrete lived experience transformed into the sublimely sacred and universal.

Rusted metal parts, the artist's paintings of sacred or alchemical symbols, natural elements weathered by climate, glass washed up on the beach, keepsakes and their containers all recur as motifs in the exhibition. Jewelry boxes, frames, and curio cabinets give a hint of geometry, with parallel yet not quite methodical arrangements. Fragments are symbolically preserved in clear resin, or anchored in plaster. Enigmatic associations across time and place confound any easy connotations, such as Schenkelberg's inclusion of glass slides with images of ancient art, itself an abandoned technology of an image of a ruin. The show's main installation, "Continuum", suggests a mystical cabinet of curiosities, written in a symbolic ancient language. A strangely precious air to the ruins thus compiled permeates the work, as if the narrator of this story is trying to recreate a portrait, using only dilapidated and fragmented clues as their starting point. For us, seeing the world in 2020, Schenkelberg's simultaneous omnivorous interests and narrative restraint allows for us to import our own story, and to hope for a recovery that will inevitably spring forth.